Sensory Processing Disorder and Mainstream School

Sensory Processing Disorder and Mainstream School

Children with Sensory Processing Disorder may end up attending a mainstream school. This could be for many number of reasons including the lack of availability of special schools, not meeting the criteria for special schools or just wanting them to attend a mainstream school. You may want to just send the child who has sensory difficulties to the local mainstream school so that they mix locally with their peers or you may want to consider what they will offer in terms of help and support.

Sensory Processing Disorder and Mainstream School

Sensory Processing Disorder and Mainstream School things to consider:

I was really nervous about The Sensory Seeker starting at a mainstream school but actually I think it was the best thing for him. He is now going into year 2 and doing really well. I believe this is down to the support of the school.

  1. A school that cares..

For me it was very important for me (as well as my child) to know that the school would talk to me before my son attended, to help alleviate any fears. Unfortunately the primary school my other 2 boys were at did not care and said lots of negative things about my child (and my parenting). It was then that I looked for alternatives (for ALL of them).

  1. A school that understands.

The school that my boys moved to had a good understanding of Sensory Processing disorder and offered suggestions on how they could help. I don’t think the school needs to have previous experience (which they did) but they DO need to listen. I think this is especially important as individuals have different Sensory Diets and therefore will be affected differently.

  1. A school that supports.

I feel that we have been really lucky and the Head Teacher/SENCO has been really supportive. She works long & hard, knows her stuff, researches what she does not know, asks for our input, is always approachable – and found the money required for full time support as needed for our Sensory Seeker. She even has helped with suggestions to help support him out of school.

Sensory Processing Disorder and Mainstream School

Each of the Senses and Problems in Mainstream School

Auditory – how are the classrooms laid out? Is their provision if the child needs extra noise stimulation, or somewhere quiet? Will the teachers shout? How to they handle undesirable behaviour? Will the individual be told off, or just praised for desirable behaviour?

Visual Sense – What are the displays like? Is there too much or not enough stimulation around?

Proprioception & Vestibular Sense – Is there playground equipment? Are there rules? Do the school have any gross motor skills programmes? Will they ensure the child is supported during PE lessons? Does the school have stairs? Will there be additional support with toileting and eating (not stuffing too much food into their mouth so that they choke) and/or getting food all over the place. That the right amount of stimulation is provided so that they do not appear too rough on others.

Tactile – that they have enough input through touch and are given clear rules and guidelines about touching others (without feeling that they are being told off). Help with food (again) to take into account any texture problems as they can be very particular about things touching or the sensations from the food. Help dealing with not getting covered in things (food, paint, mud etc) if a tactile sensory seeker. Also helping to develop peer relationships and explaining why the individual is standing too close/trying to touch/covering themselves in food. Will the school allow the child to bring in sensory aids such as a weighted blanket and/or chewy toy?

Olfactory – Is food cooked on the premises? Are there any other obvious smells? Can the child bring in a hankie or something else with fragrance?

Other Posts you may find of interest:

Obviously I have written this post with my very limited experience of our own Sensory Seeker who seems to be quite mild and coping really well. I would love to hear feedback and suggestions for other parents of children with Sensory Processing Disorder in the comments below. Thank you.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

I think that it is obvious from the mere mention of Disneyland that this is going to be a place with plenty of sensory experiences. How someone manages Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder is going to be determined by how they are effected. This post is written in terms of how we helped The Sensory Seeker when we visited Disneyland Paris and an insight into things you may want to consider if planning a visit. The things may also apply to other Disney parks.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

How old is the person you are taking to Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder?

We had previously taken The Sensory Seeker in the first two years of his life. Obviously we were unaware of his Sensory Processing Disorder at that time and believed things were due to his age. He pretty much cried and cried the whole time. Obviously we have also learnt a lot more about how to deal with his Sensory issues since but I do think you need to consider the person’s age. And height. As with all theme parks there are restrictions on rides with minimum height requirements. Some children are easier than others to explain this to. Find out which rides they can and cannot go on and plan accordingly.

When to go to Disneyland with Someone with Sensory Processing Disorder

I think you really need to ask yourself what is best for the individual with Sensory Processing Disorder. If they are an avoider then it is going to be much harder for them to cope with peak season for example. Or the added touches of celebrations of Halloween and Christmas may be far too overwhelming. What are their main sensory problems – for example Spring is more likely to have a very high smell from the flowers.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing DisorderHow long is the park open (as it is open much later with fireworks/music/lights display on selected dates not all). If they are of school age and not home schooled I think that you need to consider how missing school will affect them by going at a quieter period. Personally we went in the May half term holidays – this is slightly quieter as French children are still at school. We felt that The Sensory Seeker is behind his peers too far to miss school for that period of time. Also think about how long you are going for. Would it be better lots of days and spread it out, or would one day in the parks suit the individual better and get it all out of the way? Think realistically about what you want to cover. It really helped us that we had been previously so knew which rides to head for. Also check what will be open.

When to tell the individual with Sensory Processing Disorder that they are going to Disneyland

A lot of things I would agree that planning and preparation is key. With Disneyland I don’t feel so much. The Sensory Seeker was told the night before, and even then I feel this was too early. He knows what Disneyland is, it is on the television ALL the time. He was hyped and had trouble sleeping. My only real problem with not preparing him is that he thought that we were going to Disney World and so was disappointed to find a pink castle.

How going to Disneyland can affect those with Sensory Processing Disorder

Auditory – there’s going to be a lot of noise stimulation – from the crowds, music from the carnivals, the rides. This can be a problem for both avoiders and seekers (as they can become overstimulated) – you may want to consider the use of ear plugs or headphones. They could take an i-pod and have their favourite music on it, or some calming down sounds. We also took a Kidizoom Smart Watch as he was able to record sounds into it – which is what helps him calm down (and was great whilst he had to wait). Think about how much noise there will be on each ride – will you need to warn them? Will it have any sudden sounds? Before you go try to work out where the more noise and quiet areas of the park are. Offer breaks and seek solace in the quiet. If your child is not scared of hand dryers then I found that these were quieter and offered a welcome break. Listen to them and give them control about what they want to do.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

Visual – You cannot escape the visual stimulation at Disneyland. I couldn’t even begin to list it but the rides and special effects, the characters, the flowers, the Castle, the displays – I could go on.  Again consider the rides – is it dark or are there a lot of light effects. If they are a seeker think about spacing out the stimulating rides so that they do not over stimulate themselves. Sunglasses and hats are good at reducing the visual stimulation for avoiders. Seek places to sit in the shade or where it is darker – such as under trees. If a Seeker cannot get enough visual stimulation whilst at Disneyland (perhaps whilst waiting) then maybe take a toy spinner with lots of colours for them to focus on. This may also help you move on around the park if they get fixated with the visual stimulation in one part of the park/ride. If you take a pushchair (or hire one) consider getting a dark cover for it to block out the light and allow some chill out time.

Proprioception & Vestibular This is really a case of thinking about the rides again. Will they throw out their sense of proprioception – and how will they cope with this in such a crowded environment. Find the space for them if they need to spin around, or run, or allow them time out/let them rock, take weighted items with you if needs be, and consider hiring a pushchair (which isn’t like the “baby” versions). Let them carry the backpack – the weight of it will give them more of an awareness about where their body is.

Tactile – This will differ depending on the weather. Will you have a problem with getting them to wear sun lotion or a hat? Will hot or cold weather be better for their coping? Could they wear gloves/ear defenders/a coat? The Sensory Seeker actually got us to buy a new hat with ears that hang down the sides of his face.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

Think about how you cope normally with issues such as labels and textures in clothing. Might this change throughout the day with the different stimulation? Could you take alternate clothes? (We took them in case of a toileting accident too). What will they be like in the crowds? You can visit Guest Services in City Hall to get a green card which will help with queuing/parades/displays etc. Take with you proof of the condition (they recommended a blue parking badge). They will also give a guide to disabilities and are very helpful. This will allow the individual with Sensory Processing Disorder not to have to stand in the big queues. The Sensory Seeker is very much into touching people’s faces and licking them so this card helped a great deal. Again a weighted blanket is good, and/or something to fiddle with.

We took plenty of snacks – try to take ones with a variety of textures. Also think about whether the Character meet and greets are okay for your child or a bit too overwhelming. Alternative watch the carnival as they go by but do not get too close. If you are staying at night it can get very dark but there are also lots of lovely lights around the park.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing Disorder

Note the worst part for me, never mind The Sensory Seeker, was getting through the bag check. It is crowded and people push (so desperate to get into the park). If you book a Disney hotel you get magic hours which means you can go earlier so it is less busy. There are quicker queues if you have no bag so I let my family go through and meet me on the other side.

Disneyland with Sensory Processing DisorderGustatory – check out what foods there are available before you go. You can take things in with you too. There are lots of water fountains about but we knew that The Sensory Seeker would not drink it so took some squeezy in to flavour it.

Olfactory – there are a LOT of flowers and smells from food. You could take your own scent in a bottle or on a cloth. Other than that I am not sure what you could do about it but it is something to be aware of. If anyone has any suggestions about this sense (or any of the others) I would appreciate your comments in the box below please.

Top Tips for Disneyland Paris and Sensory Processing Disorder

  • If you can book the on-site hotel – this will give you the opportunity for breaks, quietness, leaving things (such as weighted blankets) and so you can watch the firework display without it being too crowded/noisy (I say this I have never actually stayed so please check this is accurate).
  • Continue any Sensory Diet and Sensory exercises that you utilise at home.
  • Split up as a family if need be – allowing the individual time to relax or go on rides that suit their needs without the whole day needing to revolve around them.
  • Consider whether rides are proprioceptive (spinny), calming (water), dark or with lots of lights.
  • Listen to them – they may have loved spinning around at the beginning of the day but by the end it may all be too much.
  • Most importantly be flexible. For example if you were planning on staying for the fireworks and they just cannot cope then it won’t be enjoyable for anyone.
  • If you have a Seeker go and visit the big fan in Walt Disney Studios.

 

Visit Pinkoddy or tips on visiting Disneyland Paris on a small budget.  With special thanks to AttractionTix who made the trip affordable.

Sensory Seeker Progress Aged 6

Sensory Seeker Progress Aged 6

I thought I would give you a little update on The Sensory Seeker. He turned 6 at the end of April and is currently in year 1 of a Mainstream school. In previous years the topic has come up about him staying back a year and we had decided not to. Well I am (touch wood) pleased to say that this hasn’t come up this year. He is making remarkable progress in all areas and we are so proud of him.

Sensory Seeker Progress Aged 6

Speech and Language

He has met his target for Speech and Language of talking about what happens next (although the SALT did agree that this is with guidance from his TA). He still keeps calling girls he but now knows that he should be saying she and does correct himself. He needs to work on “why” questions but I am noticing even more that things are very black and white. For example he was asked why was the girl standing on the stool and he was unable to answer the why because he was too busy explaining that she was naughty and shouldn’t be! His reading and amount of words he knows by just looking at them is coming on in leaps and bounds.

Sensory Seeker Progress Aged 6I think the second pack of the Alphablocks Reading Programme has helped with this. This set introduces the “letter teams” and blending them in a fun way with activities and games – not forgetting those all-important gold stars to reward him when he gets it right. I feel that books each progress well from each other, and the second set from the first. They are interesting and colourful. I do like the flash cards and think that they are very beneficial for The Sensory Seeker as they are so visual.

Diet, Health & Hygiene

Sensory Seeker Progress Aged 6Obviously there was no miracle and he still eats nowhere near as good as his brothers but I can hand on heart say I think that the free school meals provided at school have really helped give him the push to try new things. It is all too easy to give in at home, worrying that your child may starve – but at school there is only the food provided and no other option. He asked for grapes in his cereal this morning and his dad accidentally put milk in the bowl too – BUT he still ate it all.

The Sensory Seeker is regularly using his brown inhaler morning and night, and even reminding me to give it him. We have had far less (toileting) accidents in the day and night – and now even sleeps in his normal pants.

I guess swimming also comes under this section and I am really pleased to say that he is coping well in group swimming lessons now. In fact I do not have to watch him all the time when he has a lesson now and so was really surprised at just how well his swimming ability has come along on our recent holiday.

Maths

Well he is super whizzy at maths and is not only counting but making number bonds up to twenty.

Gross & Fine Motor Development

The Sensory Seeker’s gross motor skills are also coming along well if watching him on his Microscooter is anything to go by! He still needs to develop more of a sense of other people’s space but physically he is able to use his body to move well.

He still isn’t holding a pencil properly but can write legibly with support. Given the option he preferred to use a pencil over the tablet which is great news. We keep on providing him with things to help develop his fine motor development. LEGO is a big favourite in our house and it is everywhere and played with every day at all times. It is the only toy I have all over my house!

Busy Busy Things That Go 2000 Stickers Big, Fast, loud and tough!

Sensory Seeker Progress Aged 6There is nothing better than a good sticker activity book to help develop those fine motor skills. This book is just perfect for my little boy with it being packed full of diggers, buses, planes, boats, demolition vehicles, tractors, ambulances, fire engines, trains, scooters and so on. There is a great mix of colouring in, stickers and activities such as mazes, follow the line, spot the difference and observation skills. I love how all the stickers give a lot of free expression and creativity without making any mess.

It was also very beneficial for helping him develop more of a relationship with his older brother (aged 7) as they were both able to share the book, as well as work on it together.

ISBN 978-1-4723-6699-3 £8.00 Parragon Books Ltd

Friendships

The Sensory Seeker seems to get on well with others and has certain people he asks to play with. I am sad to hear him talk about how other children get invited to each other’s houses and he doesn’t but that could have absolutely no relation to his special needs. He is being invited to parties and no-one is nasty to him. The Sensory Seeker does still need help in maintain play going as he can join in but then doesn’t understand properly how to play by other’s rules.

We were sent Busy Busy Things That Go 2000 Stickers Big, Fast, loud and tough! and  the Alphablocks Reading Programme free of charge for purposes of review. All words and opinions are my own.

Sensory Temperature Issues and Possible Solutions

Sensory Processing Disorder is when the brain struggles with the ability to filter out stimulus from the senses, which  it does not need to function at that time. One of the senses that may be affected is that of temperature. However, sensory temperature issues are not often discussed in their own right. I believe that sensory temperature issues may just be the difficulty at work in many situations, therefore it is best to consider whether there is a problem. This is known as one of the problems with the interoceptive sense.

Sensory Temperature Issues with the Environment

Sensory Temperature Issues and Possible SolutionsThose with Sensory Processing Disorder may struggle for their brains to regulate the temperature of their bodies in the environment, in the same way neurotypical people do. For example those with sensory temperature difficulties may feel hot whilst others feel cold. It may be that they refuse to wear a coat, or in more extreme cases no clothes at all. I have not been diagnosed personally, but often find that when others are cold I feel really hot. Sensory difficulties with temperature can mean that heat can be really unwelcome and make those affected feel ill. Personally my skin goes all tight and itchy, my head hurts, I feel all dizzy and like I cannot breathe. It may be that the individual with Sensory temperature issues is having trouble sweating to cool down (or the opposite they might sweat too much).

It is important to make sure that their behaviours ARE sensory temperature related and not just behavioural (such as just not wanting to wear a coat), or other sensory issues such as due to tactile sensory issues (the coat feels uncomfortable due its texture). The main difficulties The Sensory Seeker has with temperature and environment are the fact that he finds snow too cold (but really wants to touch it) and cannot stand having sun lotion on. Temperature could affect how those with sensory processing disorder/autism react in many situations because the room is either too hot or too cold – including when they are brushing their teeth, refusal to have a bath (which also needs to be the right temperature – some like it really hot, others really cold and others tepid!), eating dinner, going to sleep, etc – make sure that temperature is ruled out!

Sensory Temperature issues with Food

Sensory Temperature Issues and Possible SolutionsWhether food is the right temperature is not just an issue for those with sensory processing disorder. Have you ever been served something you found too hot or cold? You know that if it is too hot you can blow on it (or wait). That if it’s too cold it will need reheating you simply cannot eat it. You also will appreciate that there will always be certain foods that you may prefer hot but will eat cold (in my case it is with pizza).The individual with sensory temperature issues is just the same, but may not have the same “tastes” as you. Also because it is a problem with the brain regulating the sense of temperature, they may not like the temperature to be the same every time! So one day you may cook them scrambled egg and they may like it as soon as it’s cooked, yet another time it is deemed too hot and they wait until it is stone cold before they eat it! We find that The Sensory Seeker is still developing an understanding of temperature (to regulate things himself) and sometimes needs persuading to try the food again (for example if it was previously too hot but now time has passed we know it will be cooler).

Ways to help with Sensory Temperature Issues

Sensory Temperature Issues and Possible SolutionsMy advice would be to really get to know and understand the individual with sensory temperature issues. Ask yourself if it really is a problem, and why – are they going to get ill for example. Think of ways you may be able to get around it for example, it is not very practical for the child to go out without any clothes on, but maybe you could find something very lightweight for them. Consider whether clothing covers the body or not. Those who are easily cold may prefer long sleeves. I cannot stand long sleeves as I am easily hot. What I tend to do is wear layers, with a short sleeved vest top on the bottom (well above my underwear) so that I can easily adjust my temperature that way (quickly). I take a coat that can be easily stored in a bag if there is a risk of it raining. There are special clothes that can be bought to help regulate body temperature, otherwise I have heard that silk and bamboo materials are good. Of course you may be able to manipulate the temperature of the environment with heating and air-conditioning – but this may not suit others, and the individual with the sensory disorder may not like the noise (or feel).

Be patient – can you just wait for food to cool down? Could you reheat food, because they have said it is too cold when normally they like it cold? Somethings I think have to just be accepted as being “difficult” – The Sensory Seeker often asks for ice-cream but then finds it too cold to eat. We just let him try it every time. Maybe one day he will even get the association that ice-cream is cold (and he doesn’t like that).

Do you have any sensory temperature issues or solutions?

gruffalo live relaxed performance

Gruffalo Live Relaxed Performance: Mousetrap Theatre Projects

Mousetrap Theatre Projects will be showing a Relaxed Performance of The Gruffalo on Tuesday 4th August 2015 at 2pm, in assocation with Tall Stories and Kenny Wax Family Entertainment. Based on the award winning book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, The Gruffalo Live follows the story of Mouse on an adventurous journey through the deep, dark wood…

Gruffalo Live relaxed performance

Gruffalo Live Relaxed Perfomance ReviewWe previously watched a Relaxed Performance of The Gruffalo Live in Birmingham and thought it was amazing. It really brought the book to life, but without being dull, too predictable but not too unfamiliar either.

Relaxed Performances are perfect for those with Sensory Processing Disorder, Autism and other learning, communication and sensory disorders. Not only do relaxed performances have adjustments made to sound and lighting, free resources to help you prepare for your visit and trained volunteers and staff at the event, but they are also keen to adapt the performance, as much as they can, to meet any additional needs. If you have any questions, suggestions or requirements that are not already catered for then let me know please.  I can not only feed them on to the project manager, but other places who are trying to ensure a fully inclusive experience for all.

Unfortunately wheelchair space is very limited and restricted to one carer sitting with the user. There is no level access to the auditorium, nor is there a stair climber. There is the option to book a transfer seat if the individual is able to walk or be carried to the auditorium – again this needs to be arranged prior to the performance.

gruffalo live relaxed performance

  • Lyric Theatre, Shaftesbury Avenue
  • Tuesday 4thAugust
  • 00pm
  • For ages 3+
  • Tickets from £12.50 – £2.50

Tickets are in 3 pricing bands

  1. Band 1:£12.50 (Adult) & £7.50 (Child) – These will be in the Stalls or Dress Circle
  2. Band 2: £7.50 (Adult) & £5 (Child)  – These will be in the back or front 2 rows of the Stalls or Back of Dress Circle
  3. Band 3:£5  (Adult) & £2.50 (Child) – These will be in the Upper Circle

Booking Criteria

  • Gruffalo Live Relaxed Perfomance ReviewAt least onemember of the group must be a young person with special needs (5 – 23)
  • HALF or MORE of the group must be young people aged 5 – 17, or 23 for young people with special needs. (Two parents are welcome to bring one child)
  • Applications from families have to be referred by one of the Partner Organisations (The Sensory Seeker is one of those organisations so if you wish to go please get in touch with myself).
  • Strictly one application per family, maximum 6 people per application
  • If you wish to come as a group of families, please fill in one application per family and leave a note in the final section of the application form
  • MTP relaxed performances are designed to accommodate families to attend the theatre together as a unit – if you are a school or organisation that would like to arrange a group visit then let me know and I will get in touch with the Project Manager).
  • Tickets are allocated on a first come, first served basis and are subject to availability

This is a charity performance, funded and subsidised to provide access to the West End for young people with special needs and their families.

Papier Mache Bunnies

Papier Mache Bunnies

Papier Mache BunniesPapier Mache is such a great craft idea for The Sensory Seeker – as not only does he get the touch sensation from the paper but also the slime from the glue. It gives him the opportunity to get his hands dirty and build his sense of achievement – as he can easily mould his creation into shape.

The materials needed for Papier Mache Bunnies are very few. There’s a number of ways of mixing up Papier Mache paste but I simply mixed PVA glue with water. Next we took a toilet roll holder each and stuffed a ball of newspaper inside to form a head – which we secured in place with sellotape. Papier Mache BunniesThen we simply covered it all in papier mache – including over the head. After waiting for that to dry we painted it all over (again great for The Sensory Seeker for tactile but also to help with fine motor (when he used a brush to paint). We also painted a white sheet of paper to cut out ears and feet (we later decided against adding on feet).

Finally once all the paint was dry we simply glued on googly eyes, whiskers (from pipe cleaners), a cotton wool tail, a pompom nose, and some teeth (made from more white paper). The boys were able to vary what their bunnies looked like by using different coloured noses, making the teeth bigger or smaller, the ears pointing up or floppy.

Papier Mache Bunnies

Papier Mache Skills for The Sensory Seeker

  • Attention: Listening skills, following instructions, patience waiting for glue to dry.
  • Turn taking: We only had one pencil, set of scissors and The Sensory Seeker needed to wait his turn.
  • Fine motor: sticking the objects on, using a paintbrush, drawing and cutting out the ears.
  • Tactile: Touching all the different materials .
  • Self-Esteem: A sense of achievement and pride. A sense of self through the individuality of changes made to the Papier Mache Bunnies.

Papier Mache BunniesThis activity was also good for The Sensory Seeker as it was made in stages – you could make the activity last longer by building up more layers of papier mache if you chose, but it also good for those with short attention spans as you could do just a few moments at a time. It also appealed to my children of different ages. You could utilise them in an egg hunt by hiding small chocolate eggs inside/underneath them.

Twits-109-Edit

Roald Dahl’s The Twits Relaxed Performance: Royal Court Theatre

Relaxed Performance of Roald Dahl’s The Twits

Twits-109-EditFor children with Sensory Processing Disorder, Autism, Learning Difficulties & Communication needs, a Relaxed Performance can help to make things more inclusive. Most importantly everyone is understanding of the individual’s difficulties and support put in place. Adjustments are made to sound and lighting; free support resources are available to prepare for the visit beforehand and during the performance benefit from the relaxed (move about/make noises) and there is a supportive atmosphere (with trained volunteers on hand) in the theatre.

The Twits Show at Royal Court Theatre

Roald Dahl's The Twits Relaxed Performance: Royal Court TheatreBased on Roald Dahl’s classic Mr and Mrs Twit are not a very nice couple. They not only do nasty stuff to each other but are VILE to everyone else. Not just restricted to people as they make a family of monkeys they are holding hostage stand on their heads. Can the monkeys find a way to show those vicious Twits what for?

Families with one or more children with special needs can enjoy a Relaxed Performance of the mischievously adapted Roald Dahl’s story The Twits. Edna Walsh turns The Twits upside down and brings this revolting revolution to the Royal Court Theatre stage. For brave 8 year olds and their families on Saturday 16th May 2015 2:30pm. Tickets are priced at £12 each and lasts for 2 hours and 15 minutes (this includes a 20 minute interval)
Twits-133-Edit

Directed by John Tiffany and starring Jason Watkins (Mr Twit), Monica Dolan (Mrs Twit), Oliver Llewellyn-Jenkins (Monkey Son), Glyn Pritchard (Monkey Dad),  Cait Davis (Monkey Mum), Aimée-Ffion Edwards (Monkey Daughter) ,Dwane Walcott (The Handsome Waltzer Boy), Christine Entwisle (Tattooed Fortune Teller Lady), Sam Cox (Yorkshire Terrier Man) and Dwane Walcott, (The Handsome Waltzer Boy).

Royal Court Theatre, Sloane Square, SW1W 8AS

Sensory Processing Disorder and Relaxed Performances

Roald Dahl's The Twits Relaxed Performance: Royal Court TheatreOur experiences with The Sensory Seeker and Relaxed Performances have always been very positive. For myself the nicest thing is not feeling that The Sensory Seeker’s behaviours maybe disturbing anyone else’s viewing of the performance (as everyone who attends the performance is either in the same boat or has opted to attend that performance). For our son the important things are that he is able to get up and move about, make noises, clap his hands – without us trying to make him stop (or bribe him with too many sweets!). Other benefits have definitely been the support of making the experience familiar before it happens.

If you have any questions about Relaxed Performances or anything about this particular show then do comment below or contact me via e-mail or social media and I shall try to get it answered for you.

This is not a sponsored post. Photo Copyright belongs to Manuel Harlan and not to be used without permission.

Cheltenham Autism Support Group

Cheltenham Autism Support Group – For Families with Children on the Autistic Spectrum

About Cheltenham Autism Support Group

Cheltenham Autism Support is for families with children on the Autistic Spectrum run by Laura and Wayne. They provide the opportunity to meet with other parents and children affected by Autism. There is a soft play area, sensory room, dressing up, arts & crafts, lots of toys,and an outdoor play area. They also provide refreshments for both the adults and children.

Cheltenham Autism Support Group“Receiving a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder can be somewhat overwhelming for parents, carers and siblings of the affected child. Many families feel isolated and lack vital support and understanding of the condition. Cheltenham Autism Support Group aims to combat these issues and provide families with an emotional and practical support network, enabling them to tackle and understand the uniquely wonderful world of Autism.”

Whether you strongly suspect your children to be on the Autistic Spectrum or have a diagnosis why not visit to access a wealth of information, resources and support and/or share your experiences. You may be able to offer help to others. Or just to let your child/ren benefit from the facilities and interactions with other children in a supportive environment.

When Cheltenham Autism Support Group Meet Up

Cheltenham Autism Support Group meet up for their Rainbow Days Sessions meet every THURSDAY at Gardeners Lane Children’s Centre, Cheltenham, GL51 9JW between 3:15pm-5:15pm: Plus every THURSDAY during the school holidays/half term between 9:30-12:30am and alternate SATURDAYS 1pm-5pm.

Cheltenham Autism Support GroupThey also meet once a month on SUNDAYS at Hop, Skip & Jump, Seven Springs, Cheltenham, GL52 9NG 10am-1pm – where there is also a Sensory Garden.

No need to book in an advanced just drop in and out when it is convenient to you. Find help with issues such as diagnosis, the new EHC plans, accessing Grants for the disabled, help with sleep, sensory issues, schooling, transport to school, diet, relationships, speech and language, and much much more.

Cheltenham Autism Support offers support, advice and a listening ear. You can also find them on Facebook or Email them at: CheltenhamAutismSupport@outlook.com

 

Is there any point seeking a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome as an adult?

Asperger’s Syndrome: Is there any point seeking a diagnosis as an adult?

Is there any point seeking a diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome as an adult?

I often wonder whether it is worth being assessed for whether I have Asperger’s Syndrome or not. But as an adult is there any point in seeking a diagnosis even if I did? It has been hard enough fighting for support for my children, never mind myself. Is there even much support out there for adults with Asperger’s Syndrome: For women even? Where would I begin and what would it achieve.

Why I even considered that I may have Asperger’s Syndrome

Is there any point seeking a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome as an adult?I first started to consider that I may have Asperger’s Syndrome when a seed was planted in my head when my oldest son was diagnosed. We were asked whether I had any traits as part of his diagnosis. I often have `meltdowns’ but have always just put them down to all the undealt with issues from my childhood. We did mention the fact that I cannot have hangers with nothing on them left in the wardrobe in between clothes. I hate change and really struggle with it. And of course I really struggle with relationships whether people want to admit it or not.  I do not understand really the concept of things not being the way the rules say and just ignoring it. I know people do not like to be corrected and if I think hard about it I can stop myself from acting – but the thoughts are still there. I am sure there a lots more reasons that put me in the three areas of the triad but I try not to think about it too much as I feel like I am trying to make myself fit when I may not.

What would a diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome mean for me?

Is there any point seeking a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome as an adult?But a diagnosis (if I were) – well that wouldn’t change any of that would it. Possibly if I knew there was a cause would that make me feel any better about myself? And what if it was determined that I wasn’t on the Spectrum – would that make me feel bad that I have these behaviours with no reason – would the Asperger’s give me a reason to feel so different? Am I just hoping that it would give me a sense of belonging? Would there be any help I could access to help me fit in better? I mean I know that I am useless at small talk: I can barely even manage to say hello how are you on social media when I have something I want to discuss. I have made myself aware of this and try to at least apologise and say it afterwards – or is this normal? Am I actually just too self-absorbed?

If you have been diagnosed, or know of anyone who has, as an adult – then how did you know? And what did you do?

You may have found this page and discovered that I do not have Asperger’s Syndrome, or would like to talk to someone who has received a late diagnosis, therefore I can recommend that you visit Jax’s who has.

I would really appreciate any feedback on this topic please. x

dinosaur books

Dinosaurs #KidsCoop

All about the Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs are always a popular area of interest but with the new Jurassic World film coming out this year I think that they are going to be more popular than ever. Dinosaurs are popular in our house – we had a dinosaur bedroom, a dinosaur party, played with the dinosaur in ice and even invited the dinosaurs to dinner!!

We have just had The Sensory Seeker’s annual review (as he has a Statement of Special Education Needs) and have discovered that he is now working at National Curriculum levels in Maths and Reading. This is fantastic news and we feel that he has benefited from all the extra support he receives. So I am pleased to share with you two books that Parragon have sent us to review on the subject of Dinosaurs.

Dinosaur Books

dinosaurs

Dino Supersaurus T-Rex Terror – The Supersaurus Legend Begins

Dino Supersaurus T-Rex Terror - The Supersaurus Legend BeginsThis is a beautifully illustrated book set in a cartoon strip. That’s lots of action and the pictures tell the story to help with the words. It really is a book for slightly older children but it was good to read with The Sensory Seeker picking out high frequency words I know he knows. Thus making it fun and rewarding for him. The only thing he found confusing was that the speech is written in capital letters – but it was good to explain to him about different types of text (not that I am sure he got it at his age).

£5.99 ISBN: 978- 1 -4723 – 6466 – 1

Gold Stars Travel Back Through Time to The Land of Dinosaurs

dinosaur booksThis book is fantastic and maintains interest for a long time. Again fantastically illustrated and filled with lots of facts and fun. The book has contents, glossary and index pages which I think are great in a children’s book. Through the book children learn all about dinosaurs in an enjoyable and interactive way with puzzles, mazes, colouring in, observations and much more. Every page is just bursting with life, and there’s so much to see, do and learn.

£7.99 ISBN: 978- 1 – 4723 – 5781 – 6

Find over 450 great dinosaur posts on my Dinosaur Pinterest Board

The Weekly Kids Co-Op


I was sent the 2 books free of charge from Parragon Books as part of their blogger programme. All words and opinions are my own.