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party sensory processing disorder

The Only Child Not Invited

It is that time of year again – Party Season. I know it is hard when a child is different to others to cope with their additional needs at a party – but honestly The Sensory Seeker is doing so well that I would actually say he isn’t much different to the others. I do understand that not everyone needs to be invited to every party but it is hard (probably more for me than him) when he is that child: You know the only child out of the whole class who hasn’t been invited.party sensory processing disorder

It isn’t even so much about the party it’s about him knowing he’s not fitting in. That it is okay for everyone else to go so why not him as well? The ironic thing today was that he came out with a sheet about worries – the school obviously trying to get disclosures for social services with the use of a Worry Monster. Ironic because they weren’t very sympathetic to listening to these worries; simply saying there’s nothing we can do. I explained that I knew they couldn’t make him be invited to the party (although I am sure his EHC Plan probably does make provision to ensure that he socialises/fits in with his peers) and that I didn’t like how it was so apparent to him that he was the only one not invited (erm like they had all been handed out in front of him). I was reassured that they had only been given out at break time. It is real progress that he is getting so smart. Previously he never noticed this happening but still wanted a party to invite everyone to. A blessing and a curse of his development.

His birthday is coming up and we are taking him out of the country but he wants to have a sleepover a different day this year. He doesn’t really care who it is (well actually his first preference is his 14 year old cousin who doesn’t live near us!) he just wants a friend – someone who wants to spend time with him. But again the school will tell me that he does have friends, that he is a happy and likable member of the class – so how come he doesn’t feel that he is/has because he isn’t invited?alone at playtime

Disclaimer: He is invited to the odd party and I am very thankful to those parents. I just wish this wasn’t even a thing. Why invite all but one?!

party planning sensory processing disorder

Party Planning and Sensory Processing Disorder

party planning sensory processing disorderFor children with Sensory Processing Disorder parties are a whole different ball game. I am so proud of how far my Sensory Seeker has come with coping with them. In fact I would go as far to say that at the last party the parents who do not know him would never have thought that he has any additional needs at all. There were signs there (a bit of spinning on the floor and ok maybe the rubbing a cookie on his head) but nothing that couldn’t be put down to a quirky five year old. Of course the problems can change from child to child with Sensory Processing Disorder, and the same child at different times, dependent on whether they are seeking or avoiding, and which areas affect them.

 I asked for advice from the experts of Sensory Processing Disorder – that is parents and those who have SPD themselves, through Facebook groups and Twitter, on how to prepare your child for a party and how to plan one yourself when consider the child with Sensory Processing Disorder.

You need to consider whether the child is an Avoider or a Seeker

Remember that your child can fit into both of this categories for the different Sensory areas, or at different times.

The Avoider

If you have a Sensory avoider they may not be interested in attending parties at all. They may be anxious before they even get there and then not even want to join in with the party. The Avoider may not eat, want to leave their parent’s side and become easily upset. They may not like the noise, colours, the crowds, the stimulations.

How to help an Avoider with Parties

party sensory processing disorderTalk to the child about the party and what to expect in the days leading up to it. If possible show them visual aids to familiarise themselves with the venue, or read books about parties. You may need to take ear plugs/defenders and/or sunglasses to help block out the lights and sounds.

If it is not your party then make sure the host is aware of your child’s needs. If it is your child’s party then make sure you have means for the primary caregiver to stay with the child (helping with anxiety/safety and encouraging them to join in) and that you have enough help from others to ensure that the other guests can be looked after.

The Avoider may be upset at little things, so keep it simple. Make things quiet, avoid balloons, flashing lights, loud music/noise, just whisper Happy Birthday and have no singing or fuss, as it may be too much for the sensitive auditory system. A small party is easier to control. They may not eat so make sure you have the food they are most likely to eat. Give them a separate quiet room for them to go to.

The Seeker

May want all the stimulations – lots of balloons, colours, sounds, but over stimulate themselves. Or they may like the feel but be scared of the noise when they go pop. They may become over hyped up and excitable, want to touch everything/everyone, may be spinning all over the place and knocking into other people, jumping on balloons trying to make them burst.

My Sensory Seeker can get a bit hyper about when the party is as he has very little understanding of time. What we found worked is that he has “party clothes” and he now understands that we leave for the party after he has got changed into them. Luckily we have never had a problem entering a party as he is a Seeker – he loves the noise, the colours, and atmosphere, always wanting MORE, MORE, MORE. Now his patience and attention has increased he is able to join in with the party games, but a party that has structure is much better for him.

party planning sensory processing disorderWhat we do need to be careful is that he does not get too over stimulated. He seems to self-regulate himself now by doing things such as spinning on the floor. I still have to watch that he doesn’t invade other children’s space too much, or if he spins on the floor that there’s room and he’s not going to trip people up. As I mentioned he has trouble visually seeing food he wants but cannot have. To be fair to him he has developed loads in this area and does no longer grab it, I do see him being more anxious/worked up due to it though. I also need to make sure that he does not put too much food into his mouth at once (stuffing). What food is available can be an issue but there’s usually something unhealthy that he will like (typical birthday food either sandwiches and biscuits or chips). He can be a bit messy and try to pile too much food on his plate. I just supervise him and make sure I take him to wash his hands (you could also take wipes but we are trying to encourage him to move forwards and feel he has an association with babies with them). Plenty of sweets throughout really help him as it gives him something oral he can touch and taste.

Planning a Party for a Child with Sensory Processing Disorder

Party Size and Location

When determining the party location you need to consider the time of year (indoors or outdoors), the number of guests you would like (think about whether the child will be under or overwhelmed and how many you can cope with), whether your child needs plenty of space to move around/a small quiet party – as well as your budget. Also will the other guests need someone to stay and supervise them? Are there any access requirements for the Birthday child or their guests? Also consider their developmental ages and abilities as to a venue’s suitability. If there is food included with the venue then does it meet the needs of the party guests?

Party Food

Personally parties where the food is brought out when it is ready to be eaten suits us better, and it also means that Avoiders will not have the foods’ smells. Also we find cold food is better, as it is dry and not touching. Again you need to consider what the Sensory issues are in regard to the food on making decisions about it, such as whether it is hot or cold, textures and smells. Be careful when it is dished out – my son loves burgers and ketchup but when someone else put his burger in the ketchup he would not eat it.

Neverland Cake from Keep Up With The Jones Family
Neverland Cake from Keep Up With The Jones Family

Time, Duration & Calming down

Consider the time of day of the party, how long your child can handle the sensory input and somewhere/something to help calm them down afterwards. If the child cannot cope with stimulation for long consider having a shorter party. You may want a morning party because the child is anxious about the wait, or you may want a late afternoon party so that it is not long until bedtime.

To help settle down at the end of the party you could put on a film, have an area for playing with Lego, doing some craft or colouring: Use stickers and wax crayons to avoid sensory seekers eating the glue and licking the paint. Or the best calming device we have found technology! (DS or tablet). Or extra stimulus may be needed – such as an obstacle course, a dancing competition, lots of pressure/bear hugs/back rubs.

Party Entertainment & Decoration

The needs of the child with Sensory Processing Disorder are going to greatly determine what kind of party you have, what the entertainment and decorations is going to be like.

To engage the child and keep their attention, whether an Avoider or Seeker, utilising their interests is helpful.

“Does the birthday girl or boy have a love of something – anything… we had a London Bus party one year. Everyone got to take home a beaker, toy bus and pencil crayons.”  RosyandBo

A Sensory Seeker is more likely to want music, bouncy castles, a place to run around, lights, balloons, lots of games (musical chairs/statues/bumps) – and so on. Consider the physical abilities of the child (fine and gross motor skills, physical abilities, spatial awareness, developmental ability to cope with losing).

Tramplone Party
Triple Ts Mum Bubble Theme Party Ideas

Whilst the Avoider is more likely to prefer quite, calm maybe a craft party, with little stimulus. Use plain paper for pass the parcel to make it less visually stimulating and easier to understand which layer is being unwrapped. Use a small amount of tape so it is easy to undo. Keeping the music/passing short to avoid distractions/over stimulation.

See Triple T Mum’s Bubble theme decorations

Ideas to focus the Party

Sensory Seekers want more more more utilise what they are interested in:

Dinosaurs, Superheros, Farm, Neverland, Cooking party, bouncing (castle or trampoline), swimming party, a scavenger hunt, art & craft – have a face painter. We sometimes find our Sensory Seeker does not want the feel of paint on his face or then has to rub it everywhere – we find a cheek or even better his arm suits his needs best.

party sensory processing disorder

 For the Sensory Avoider how about a calm Movie party – with pillows and blankets laid out with a quiet film.  Or a Colouring party with colouring in tablecloths or placemats, or just pictures. For more tips on a Simple Party.

Do you have any party ideas? Or more tips on helping with a Party with a Child with Sensory Processing disorder?

sensory seeker party with reptiles

Sensory Seeker Party with Reptiles

Sensory Seeker Party Idea

Party planning can be difficult (see my party guide ), with lots of things to factor in. Who are the guests, what is your budget, will they be left, what can they eat, how will you entertain them? When it comes to your Sensory Seeker Party the first thing to think about is what will work for your child. I was really surprised to see how patient my Sensory Seeker was at a recent Wild Kids Reptile Party. In fact it wasn’t a party, it was a clever idea of a friend about us all chipping in to entertain our children in the school holidays – that it what such great value it was. We hired a hall and all bought a packed lunch. This is a good idea for a Sensory Seeker Party as there wasn’t food on view, until my Sensory Seeker could actually have it.

sensory seeker party with reptiles

Sensory Seeker Party Suitable guests for Reptiles

Obviously you need to consider who your guests are. I could not see a Sensory Seeker Party with reptiles where there are a whole bunch of Sensory Seekers, as they would not cope in this scenario. Sometimes you need the attendees to be quiet – and those Sensory Seekers who like to make a lot of noise may find this very difficult. Our party had a wide range of ages and it suited them all. I am also not sure how well it would have ran with a lot of very small children – so I would imagine it would suit at least those of school age.

sensory seeker party with reptiles sensory seeker party with reptiles

If the children did not want to hold the reptiles they could still just stroke them. The guests had the option for each reptile as to how comfortable they feel with them, and whether they wanted to hold or stroke them.  A good Sensory Seeker party will make sure there is somewhere for the guests to go if they really do not like the reptiles, or a particular reptile.

sensory seeker party with reptiles

Reptile Sensory Seeker Party Pros and Cons

It was great to see my Sensory Seeker loving all the different textures of the reptiles. This is one of the reasons I think that it would make an ideal Sensory Seeker Party. He had no fear of the reptiles and even wanted to hold the tarantula (which you have to be sixteen years and over to do).

sensory seeker party with reptiles

sensory seeker party with reptiles

I have to admit that my Sensory Seeker was much braver than me. I found the staff to be fully supportive, and very encouraging of those who were a little apprehensive. I was amazed at how well my son sat quietly, listening and waiting his turn. I think it is also that they come out to you – so you can arrange to have it in a familiar environment, or one that you know really suits your Sensory Seekers needs.

sensory seeker party with reptiles sensory seeker party with reptiles

As a Sensory Seeker Party I can see that the biggest problem would be preventing hands going in mouths. The staff had warned the children not to do this and had hand sanitiser for at the end, but my Sensory Seeker kept trying to put it his hand in his mouth. This was simply resolved by me sitting next to my son, and keeping his hands clean with antibacterial gel.

sensory seeker party with reptiles sensory seeker party with reptiles

About Wild Reptile Parties

Available throughout Gloucestershire, £120 for a one hour party  for hands on educational interaction with some of the world’s most fascinating  animals without the mess. Wild Kids Reptile Parties bring with them not only all the animals (including friendly snakes, frogs, tortoises, stick insects and leaving behind any you do not want to see), but the protective sheets and hand sanitiser.

          sensory seeker party with reptiles

For more information or to book a party please visit http://www.wildkidsreptileparties.co.uk/

This is NOT a sponsored post.