Tag Archives: autism

Cheltenham Autism Support Group

Cheltenham Autism Support Group – For Families with Children on the Autistic Spectrum

About Cheltenham Autism Support Group

Cheltenham Autism Support is for families with children on the Autistic Spectrum run by Laura and Wayne. They provide the opportunity to meet with other parents and children affected by Autism. There is a soft play area, sensory room, dressing up, arts & crafts, lots of toys,and an outdoor play area. They also provide refreshments for both the adults and children.

Cheltenham Autism Support Group“Receiving a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder can be somewhat overwhelming for parents, carers and siblings of the affected child. Many families feel isolated and lack vital support and understanding of the condition. Cheltenham Autism Support Group aims to combat these issues and provide families with an emotional and practical support network, enabling them to tackle and understand the uniquely wonderful world of Autism.”

Whether you strongly suspect your children to be on the Autistic Spectrum or have a diagnosis why not visit to access a wealth of information, resources and support and/or share your experiences. You may be able to offer help to others. Or just to let your child/ren benefit from the facilities and interactions with other children in a supportive environment.

When Cheltenham Autism Support Group Meet Up

Cheltenham Autism Support Group meet up for their Rainbow Days Sessions meet every THURSDAY at Gardeners Lane Children’s Centre, Cheltenham, GL51 9JW between 3:15pm-5:15pm: Plus every THURSDAY during the school holidays/half term between 9:30-12:30am and alternate SATURDAYS 1pm-5pm.

Cheltenham Autism Support GroupThey also meet once a month on SUNDAYS at Hop, Skip & Jump, Seven Springs, Cheltenham, GL52 9NG 10am-1pm – where there is also a Sensory Garden.

No need to book in an advanced just drop in and out when it is convenient to you. Find help with issues such as diagnosis, the new EHC plans, accessing Grants for the disabled, help with sleep, sensory issues, schooling, transport to school, diet, relationships, speech and language, and much much more.

Cheltenham Autism Support offers support, advice and a listening ear. You can also find them on Facebook or Email them at: CheltenhamAutismSupport@outlook.com

 

Logan Osborne: Man with Autism Graduates with Masters Degree

Logan Osborne: Man with Autism Graduates with Masters Degree

It shouldn’t be a big deal that a man has graduated with a Masters degree but I am sure that anyone touched by autism will know how much of a battle it can be. Their little habits, rituals, anxieties and lack of health care and social skills make it all the more difficult for them.  Any parents would be proud that their child has a first degree, so to go on to gain a Masters is even more impressive. I have written previously about my oldest son who has Asperger’s Syndrome going to University and so it is really reassuring to hear of the success of Logan Osborne.

Logan Osborne Autistic Msc StudentLogan Osborne first gained a BSc(Hons) Geography at University of Brighton in 2013. Now he has an MSc in Geographical Information Systems and Environmental Management and is looking for a job in geographical information systems.

Logan’s parents want to give some comfort to others that with the right support anything can be achieved. They say that the University of Brighton’s Disability and Dyslexia team gave Logan excellent support. Logan said that he felt that he could always talk things over with them, including checking his work, if he needed help.

If you or your child is thinking of going to University and have a disability then it should be declared in order to obtain the right support.

The Disability and Dyslexia team at the University of Brighton provides one-to-one mentoring and specialist study support, advice and help with applying for funding. Contact: disability@brighton.ac.uk 01273 643799, and for more information go to: www.brighton.ac.uk/current-students/my-studies/declaring-a-disability-or-learning-difficulty

 

Wear it for Autism 2014

Wear it for Autism 2014 #Giveaway

Wear it for Autism 2014

Date: Monday 6th October 2014

Time: Doors open at 5:30pm Show Starts at 6:30pm

Venue:  Le Chinois Restaurant and Bar, Knightsbridge, London, SW1X 9NU.

Price: £15 a ticket with FREE goody bag!

Please email lisa.robins@thevines.org.uk for a ticket order form

Wear it for Autism 2014

This red carpet event is back once again after its huge success last year.

Wear it For Autism is a fashion show with a difference. All the models taking part are Mums, Dads, Grandparents and Carers – who either have autism themselves or care for those living with the condition – they are having a full makeover and pampering before taking centre-stage. All the profits will go to the registered charity Anna Kennedy Online, which supports UK families affected by autism, including providing small grants for educational and domestic resources.

Judged by Steven Smith, Angel Sinclair, Dr Pam Spurr and Maggie Paterson, Sam Tomlin, Fiona Shepherd  the Winners  in each category for 2014 are:

Mums: Ann Wright, Sharon King, Maimuna Mutaasa and Lisa Embery-Donaghy

Dads: Craig Binns and Lee Cook

Grandparent: Sandra Trotter

Family: Anne & Steven Rann

Adult with Autism: Dani Bowman

Child with Autism: Sophie Jayne Garner

Young Carers: Demi Stamp and Emma Bell

Wear it for Autism 2014

Anna Kennedy OBE said:

“The idea behind Wear It For Autism was to spoil those who usually never get a chance to treat – or even think – of themselves. Living with autism can be challenging and extremely demanding so we wanted to create a special event, that would be fun for all involved ‘ 

Anna Kennedy OBE Wear it for Autism

Supported by Models of Diversity and Pineapple Performing Arts

Celebrity Presenters this year include: Arlene Phillips CBE, Kirk Norcross, Abz, Keith Mason, Dr Pam Spurr, Amy Willerton, Steve King, Jason Leech and many more.

Sponsors are Living Autism, Miglio Jewellry, Models of Diversity, Wish Want Wear, Damsel in a Dress , Third Sector Gallery and many more.

If you would like to be a sponsor please contact anna@annakennedyonline.co.uk 

This is not a sponsored post.

Disability access uk theme parks 2013 @pinkoddy #thesensoryseeker

Disability Access Guide to UK Theme Parks

Disability access uk theme parks 2013 @pinkoddy #thesensoryseeker

With half term just around the corner you may be thinking about what to do with the children. A theme park is a good idea for Sensory Seekers that like all that movement, smells, textures, visual images etc; but sometimes it is all too much, or too much for other people (strangers do not tend to warm to a child they do not know trying to touch them, never mind punching). It is for this reason that it is well worth checking the websites to  consider what the disability access policies are. This may include proof of disability (and what documentation),  any discounts for entrance (and/or any carers), car parking facilities, and special access to the rides. There are many reasons that disability access may be required, but there have been many people taking advantage of this, and things are changing. Make sure you are clear before you leave.

We have visited a few places over 2013 and this was our experience of the Disability Access:

Disability Access Merlin

I think that the Merlin Group are top notch when it comes to providing good disability access. When a Merlin annual pass is purchased, and proof of disability is shown, then a complimentary carer’s pass will be issued on the first visit. It is transferable between carers, but cannot be used without the disabled person. Proof is considered as Disability Living Allowance (DLA),Orange/Blue badge or a letter from the GP (with photographic proof).

Disability Access Legoland Windsor

Legoland Windsor was the first place we had heard of that had good disability access. We went with ASDfriendly, an Autism support online forum, and it is here we first discovered that a day out with a disability could still be fun.

Legoland Windsor Disability Access to rides

  • FREE Carer entrance ticket.
  • Loop System for hearing impaired.
  • Some staff who can speak sign language  (look for the word ‘sign’ on their badge).
  • Assistance dogs welcome; but they cannot ride and must remain with someone at all times.
  • Designated disabled car parking for disability badge holders (parking charges still apply).
  • Disabled toilet facilities.
  • Wheelchair hire.
  • Wheelchair accessible restaurants & shops.
  • Plenty of resting areas throughout the park.
  • Awareness band (to alert staff that extra assistance may be required).

The ride access pass requires some proof that the disabled person cannot queue. Disability living allowance and/or blue/orange badges are not accepted because they do not show what the condition is. The disability must mean that they “do not understand the concept of queuing, have difficulties with everyday social interaction, have a limited capacity to follow instruction or to understand others emotional feelings or expressions, and may become agitated or distressed having to wait for periods of time.”

Photo evidence is required, we took a passport.  At least one helper is essential, and has to be over the age of 14, or over 16 if the disabled person does not meet the height restriction. Up to 3 carers are allowed with the disabled person and can be rotated. Wheelchair users do not require a ride access pass.

Further info in the guide

Disability Access THORPEPARK

THORPEPARK‘s disability access makes it fair on all ride users by issuing  disabled ride user a card. When the card is presented at the exit a time is given that you can come back, as if you were queuing, but without having to physically stand in a queue. We saw this on the big rides at Disneyland Paris too.

Note we did not use their Disability help as we were given FastPasses so for further information on Disability access at THORPEPARK please see this post by My Life My Son My Way.

Disability Access Paultons Park

To avoid discrimination the entry price was the same for disabled as non-disabled visitors. To be fair I think a lot of Paultons Park  is the magic of Peppa Pig World, and a lot of that can be soaked up without even setting foot on a ride.

They have a Queue Assist Scheme, with which they DID accept a Disability Living Allowance letter and gave our disabled son a wrist band and card – which allowed up to 3 carers (note some rides had different rules on carer ratios and the disabled person always had to go on the ride). The card allowed him to go on each ride once, and was hole-punched as he did. This means that if he wanted to go on the same ride twice he had to then queue. We were fortunate that our son was okay with this but know how those with Autism could get quite obsessive about a ride and then have a meltdown for not being able to go back on as they are unable to queue. I do understand that lines need to be drawn though as many young children find it hard to queue without seeing someone go on the same ride more than once without the need for queuing.

Disability Access FlamingoLand

At Flamingoland there is a discounted admission price of £20 each, for a disabled person and their carer (total £40 instead of £60).

With proof of disability (DLA accepted, but photographic proof needed) a wrist band can be obtained, to allow riders to avoid the queue, and go through the exit (with a maximum of 2 carers). When we went we were told that if the disability was physically obvious, then they would not require further “proof”.

This is not a sponsored post. I was, however, given complimentary tickets in return for reviews on Pinkoddy’s blog. All thoughts and opinions are my own.