Category Archives: Play Matters

Play is very important, especially for those who are developmentally delayed, or lack social skills. However, this is not always easy with a child who is not interested. This is my journey of making play matter and ways I have found to hold my son’s attention a little longer.

Papier Mache Bunnies

Papier Mache Bunnies

Papier Mache BunniesPapier Mache is such a great craft idea for The Sensory Seeker – as not only does he get the touch sensation from the paper but also the slime from the glue. It gives him the opportunity to get his hands dirty and build his sense of achievement – as he can easily mould his creation into shape.

The materials needed for Papier Mache Bunnies are very few. There’s a number of ways of mixing up Papier Mache paste but I simply mixed PVA glue with water. Next we took a toilet roll holder each and stuffed a ball of newspaper inside to form a head – which we secured in place with sellotape. Papier Mache BunniesThen we simply covered it all in papier mache – including over the head. After waiting for that to dry we painted it all over (again great for The Sensory Seeker for tactile but also to help with fine motor (when he used a brush to paint). We also painted a white sheet of paper to cut out ears and feet (we later decided against adding on feet).

Finally once all the paint was dry we simply glued on googly eyes, whiskers (from pipe cleaners), a cotton wool tail, a pompom nose, and some teeth (made from more white paper). The boys were able to vary what their bunnies looked like by using different coloured noses, making the teeth bigger or smaller, the ears pointing up or floppy.

Papier Mache Bunnies

Papier Mache Skills for The Sensory Seeker

  • Attention: Listening skills, following instructions, patience waiting for glue to dry.
  • Turn taking: We only had one pencil, set of scissors and The Sensory Seeker needed to wait his turn.
  • Fine motor: sticking the objects on, using a paintbrush, drawing and cutting out the ears.
  • Tactile: Touching all the different materials .
  • Self-Esteem: A sense of achievement and pride. A sense of self through the individuality of changes made to the Papier Mache Bunnies.

Papier Mache BunniesThis activity was also good for The Sensory Seeker as it was made in stages – you could make the activity last longer by building up more layers of papier mache if you chose, but it also good for those with short attention spans as you could do just a few moments at a time. It also appealed to my children of different ages. You could utilise them in an egg hunt by hiding small chocolate eggs inside/underneath them.

Christmas Tree Hand Made Biscuits Gifts

Christmas Tree Hand Made Biscuits Gifts

Christmas Tree Hand Made Biscuits GiftsWhen you have a child with special needs I think that a Hand Made Christmas gift for their teachers is a really special touch. The teachers know that The Sensory Seeker does not cope with the change of routine that Christmas brings, and how hard he has worked at making their gift. Not only does it help show the progress he’s made but it also helps him cope with his Sensory imbalance. This year he made Christmas Tree biscuits – which I then simply packed into cellophane, tidied some ribbon round and added a bow.

Hand Made Christmas Tree Biscuits Gifts

The recipe to make the biscuits is slightly more complicated but The Sensory Seeker used an all in one mix which seemed to work okay.

Christmas Tree Biscuits Ingredients

250g Softenend butter, 140g castor sugar, 1 egg yolk, 300g plain flour (plus extra if it is to sticky and for the surface/rolling pin), orange flavouring

For Decoration: Ice sugar, colouring, sweets.

Christmas Tree Biscuits Method

Christmas Tree Hand Made Biscuits GiftsMeasure all the ingredients. The benefits for The Sensory Seeker were that he had to listen, follow instructions and his attention/patience were stretched. I often had to change my use of language to be simpler for him, or less abstract to him. For example after weighing the sugar and flour they both needed tipping in together. But both items were white and some The Sensory Seeker did not understand the instruction tip the sugar in with the flour. But when I told him to put the contents of the white little bowl into the green big bowl he was able to understand.

Mix together all the ingredients. The Sensory Seeker started by stirring with a spoon, this was beneficially for him learning to try and stop himself from just touching things. I did then let him mix it in with his hands – which is good for his hand development as well as getting the desired tactile sensory input that he requires.

Next the mixture was rolled out and Christmas Trees cut out using cutters. If you have no cutters I am sure a Christmas Tree shape would be easy enough to make with a knife. They were then baked in our fan oven at 180 degrees for around 20 minutes (watch the biscuits and smell them until they are ready). Let cool before decorating.

Decorating the Christmas Tree Biscuits

Christmas Tree Hand Made Biscuits GiftsSimply colour some icing green and pour over the Christmas Trees. Whilst this is still wet decorate with stars and circle sweets (to represent baubles). When this has dried squeeze on more coloured icing to represent tinsel.

Turning Christmas Tree Biscuits into Hand Made Gifts

To turn the Christmas Tree Biscuits into beautiful Hand Made Gifts then simply shape some cellophane around them (we got ones with Christmas Trees on from Ebay), and secure it in place with sticky tape. Make it more of a gift by added some ribbon in festive colours and a bow.

Christmas Tree Biscuit Gifts Benefits and Problems for The Sensory Seeker

Christmas Tree Hand Made Biscuits GiftsMaking the Christmas Tree Biscuits provided a lot of benefits to The Sensory Seeker, but there were also a few problems to overcome. Whilst making the mixture up I also talked to The Sensory Seeker a lot: This was good for his auditory sense, following instructions, and his understanding – as we discussed concepts such as number, texture, etc. He has made great relationships with the staff at school and it was great to see him taking such pride in the activity. This is great for his sense of self and of his World (thinking about others). I was actually really impressed with him asking if it was time to start the next section again when he was allowed to play on computer games. The activity was great for his hand development with mixing, rolling, cutting, transferring (the biscuits onto the tray), and fine motor for adding the sweets. Most of these also helped his hand-eye co-ordination and his sense of place. He was able to meet many aspects of his Sensory Diet such as adding in some orange flavouring, which is good for the sense of smell, whilst giving the biscuits a Christmas feel. The Sensory Seeker DID need to wash his hands A LOT as inevitably he ended up touching. The surfaces also needed a lot of cleaning. The Sensory Seeker was particularly unable to resist the butter and had to be stopped from giving the (cooked) biscuits a little kiss (to give his teachers his love). It was a great way to let him become more aware about hygiene. Sitting still is quite difficult for The Sensory Seeker so the biscuits were made in stages. He also sat on a stool that allowed him to spin around and around in circles getting his vestibular input.

Note for parents: This activity may require a lot of patience and result in a lot of mess. We did it in the kitchen (with easy wipe surfaces and floors) and not far from the sink.

Christmas-countdown

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Sensory Halloween

Halloween can be utilised  to help your child with sensory processing disorder deal with some of their difficulties. Halloween games and activities can help the child learn to deal with unpleasant situations, connect with their bodies, and fulfill some of their required Sensory Diet. Of course there is going to be benefits for both the Sensory Seeker and the Sensory Avoider – but I mainly focusing on the Sensory Seeker – as that is what I know most about, as my son is more a Seeker.

Halloween Dressing up and Sensory Processing Disorder

sensory halloweenHalloween definitely is a time to embrace dressing up. My Sensory Seeker loves nothing better than dressing up. All those different textures, and I think it really is where he is comfortable at using his imagination. Letting them get themselves dressed will also help them with orientation, textures, fastenings (zips, buttons, bows, laces etc). We also have a mirror for him – so that he can see what he looks like. I find that when he uses the mirror he also uses different expressions – and he can see what that looks like too.  Or you can use face paint – which is fantastic for tactile stimulation.

Halloween Games

The Mummy Race

Sensory HalloweenMy boys loved this game. Basically get into two teams with the child with Sensory Processing Disorder (or any child) to be the Mummy. Then get the other children to wrap them up. We used toilet paper but you could use bandages or any other white material for a deeper pressure. The winning team can either be the one who has their Mummy all wrapped up the quickest, or have a time limit and the winner is the one who is the most wrapped at the end. If you wanted to add more sensory experiences to it the Mummy could have to run around too.

Go Away Ghost!

Sensory HalloweenA number of children are scared of the dark, and at Halloween ghosts and monsters are even more likely to frighten them. The Go Away Ghost game can also be beneficial to the child who gets upset when something messy touches them (something in their shoe, a cobweb, a wet leaf, a grain of sand, wet paint); Or the child who is worried about something touching them; the unresponsive child who does not react to what is going on around them; the child who has trouble focusing on an activity, or has trouble making the transition between activities; and when they have trouble with an activity and needs removing. This game is good for their imaginations too.

The child says (whispers or shouts depending on their sensory need) – “Go Away Ghost Get off!” Get the child to use their hands to get the ghost off their whole body – pushing the ghost off their hair, down their face, shoulders, upper body, arms, hands, pulling him off their fingers, down their tummy to the legs (give him a kick off), shake him off their feet, then shake all over and jump, jump around in the space. Then get the child to take deep breaths and say, “That’s good, it is better.”

Apple Bobbin and Scary Spaghetti

I think this is especially good if your child is like mine in that he struggles with his diet. Sensory HalloweenSometimes he will not even try touching something just because of its appearance or smell. Putting some coloured water in a bowl and throw in some apples is a great way to encourage him to try putting the apple in his mouth because he knows it is a game and he is not expected to eat it. I think this takes the pressure off him. This could be used with black, red and green water – maybe have the 3 different bowls. Rewarding with sweets for participating is always a useful incentive I find too.

Sensory HalloweenIf they are not quite ready for putting their face in what about a game of scary spaghetti – where you place the cooked spaghetti in some jelly with some Halloween toys (eyes, spiders, etc) – and the idea is to put your hand in and pull out a particular Halloween toy to win. This will help them develop their sense of what things feel like, and what shapes they are without their sense of sight. You can do this with or without a face mask – depending on how comfortable they are with it.

Alternatives to Halloween Parties

Frozen Spiders

It doesn’t have to be a party with lots of people around – why not try frozen spiders in the bath. Last year my Sensory Seeker loved it. I simply filled tubs with plastic spiders and coloured water. I put them in the freezer and let my Sensory Seeker dissolve them in the bath. He had a lot of fun and discovered how the blocks of froze spiders disappear in his hot bath. Also how his bath changed colour and the fascination of more and more spiders appearing as the ice dissolved.

Sensory Halloween

Halloween Craft and Sensory Bins

Or why not have a Halloween crafting session. Great for fine motor, textures, etc. We made our own Halloween treat bags from just paper and odd bits – perfect for carry a few treats.

sensory halloween

Or why not make a sensory bin.

batman mask

Batman Mask from a Cardboard Box

Being a mother is hard work, we all know that. So why do we continuously put too many expectations on ourselves? Well I’m learning to let go of them a bit and focus on what’s important. Now that will mean different things to different people. For me I decided that spending quality time with my children is far more important than an immaculate house (in fact even if I had no children I just don’t think it’s in my nature to spend my life keeping a sparkling pin home, as I say we are all different).  I know that right now the best thing I can do for my Sensory Seeker needs to help him develop is just play with him. On a Wednesday his brother goes to football club. In fact I think so do most of his friends. But I just don’t think it is fair on anyone that he goes because of his needs. To make up for him missing out on this I make sure we do something together.

 batman mask

The Batman Mask

This week I had a nice sensory activity of salt dough lined up. This is something I have never done before and thought he’d appreciate it (I’d just need to watch that he did not put it in his mouth). But then I saw it THE CARDBOARD BOX. It just kind of screamed at me that it would make an AMAZING Batman mask! He is loving everything related to Superheroes and Villains. I popped it on my head and it was the perfect size. I simply cut out some cereal boxes for ears and stuck them on. Cut out holes for the eyes and mouth – and viola – it was ready for him to paint.

batman mask

One of his problems has been to develop his attention – how long he can sit at a task. Using something he is interested in has been a great way for helping with this. And he did, he sat and helped paint it all black (we were going for the Lego Batman look).

batman mask

Also painting Batman was good for helping with his fine motor skills, his hyper-mobility in his hands, turn taking (with the brushes), his self-confidence, he knew to paint around the holes so developed his control, as well as learning that the bigger brush covered more of the box quicker. I learnt that if you add glue to the paint it will cover the tape!

batman mask

And you know it didn’t really look that good. But he was so pleased. And most importantly we had spent that time together. Oh and he argued it was his Batman mask when I put it on – so he must have liked it.

batman mask



”Sunday

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

Tree Fu Tom Ranger Utility Belt

We love Tree Fu Tom in our house so were delighted to be about to review the Tree Fu Tom Ranger Utility Belt Set from Flair.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

 About the Tree Fu Tom Ranger Utility Belt Set

Two of our boys are in the Scouts (one is a Beaver Scout), but our Sensory Seeker (aged 4) is unlikely to be able to attend Beavers when he turns 6, due to his special needs. He of course wants to be doing what his brothers are up to. I think that this is one of the many reasons that he loved dressing up with the Ranger Utility Bet Set so much, as it comes complete with a scarf and woggle.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

There is a storage pouch where the Ranger cards and Ranger book can be stored. This can be threaded onto the adjustable belt. The utility belt has a rotating , reflector Sapstone too and spaces to clip on the Ranger badges, microscope and compass (the older brothers enjoyed explaining to their younger brother about the compass).

The Ranger Utility Belt Set is aimed at those over the age of three years so that even young adventurers can have fun. Although I would say that even at its tightest the belt is fairly lose, and feels like it could do with tightening up a bit, but this does make it easier to spin it around.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

 Tree Fu Ranger Utility Belt in the Back Garden

 This is the perfect time of year for the Ranger Utility Belt set. There are many beautiful things in nature to go off to explore and observe under the microscope. Of course the first place we went with the Tree Fu Tom Ranger Utility Belt on was into the back garden. It is inside a tree in Tom’s back garden where there is an enchanted kingdom called Treetopolis. We were looking for Tom’s best friend and side-kick Twigs, (a silly and energetic acorn-sprite), and his other friends the Treelings. We soon found Squirmtum, who is an odd-job woodlouse with a heart of gold.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

Our Sensory Seeker excitedly told me that Squirmtum looked the same as on his Ranger card. Our Sensory Seeker enjoyed looking through his microscope, telling me that it made things bigger.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

 We did not find the other Treelings –  Ariela (a beautiful but rough-and-tumble ranch-running butterfly); Treetog ((a Tree Fu Master and wise teacher), or Zigzoo, (a bubbly, eccentric tree frog inventor). However, we did find a ladybird. Our Sensory Seeker was so excited that after dinner we all decided to go off and try to find some frog spawn. We were unsuccessful but are going to look again at the weekend (when the sun is up). Then we can utilise the microscope and record what we see in the Ranger book.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

 Sensory Processing Disorder and Tree Fu Tom

 Our Sensory Seeker has problems with his gross motor skills. He is currently seeing the occupational therapist at school for this (the fizzy programme I believe) but we like to help him develop at home as much as we can. What we liked about Tree Fu Tom is that it gives him Sensory rewards for making movements.

 The Tree Fu Spells were designed with children with Dyspraxia, and other movement difficulties and disorders, in mind. The spells encourage and guide children to teach and practise the movements in many of the key areas needed for everyday activities. This can then benefit them in areas such as eating, dressing, writing, sports, games and so on. Tree Fu Tom is aimed at children who are developmentally at an important time for their growth. This belt was particularly good for our Sensory Seeker to help with his hand development – having to squeeze the clips and badges to get them on and off the belt. I think this is beneficial as the occupational therapist feels he has hypermobile hands.

tree fu tom ranger utility belt

 Tree Fu Tom is developmentally in other ways (for children with or without Special needs). Tom is a born leader using his Big World Magic to save the day against impending disasters, whilst up against the mischievous Mushas (siblings Stink and Puffy, the foolish fungi). Making the audience Superheroes as they help with the magic is very empowering, good for their confidence and helping to boost self-esteem.  The lessons in friendship are good for social and emotional development.

I would definitely recommend this product.

Spring Carnival

I was sent a free Tree Fu Tom Ranger Utility Belt Set from Flair for purposes of review. They are available from Smyths Toys. All words and opinions are my own.

kryptonite sensory play

Kryptonite Sensory Play with Superman and Doctor Octopus

Kryptonite Sensory Play

I do find that if my son has plenty of opportunities to fulfil his sensory needs throughout the day, it places him in a better mood and helps him sleep at night. The best way to get and keep his attention is to utilise his interests. Currently he is loving Superheroes and Villains, and we recently made a Batcave and dressed up.

kryptonite sensory play

I got the idea for Kryptonite Sensory Play from an idea we used at Halloween with frozen spiders. I knew that my son would love just a frozen lump of green coloured water labelled as Kryptonite. I like how quickly water freezes too, if he mentions that he’d like to do Kryptonite Sensory play in the morning I can have a block made up for when he gets home from school.

kryptonite sensory play

The sun has begun to shine more lately,  and I knew that the Kryptonite Sensory Play would be ideal outside (if not I would have done it in a nice warm bath). Coupled with one of his favourite superheroes (Superman) and villain (Doctor Octopus) he set to work on destroying the Kryptonite. First he bashed it with his characters and noticed that it went all slushy. He loved the Sensory feel when touching it on the bottom of Doctor Octopus’ feet. I liked how not only did he get his sensory needs met, but it really helped his speech and language, as he tried to explain to me what was happening to the Kryptonite.

kryptonite sensory play

And after he bashed it with his characters, and had a feel of the coldness (he loves cold), he then decided to use his feet.

kryptonite sensory play

And he stamped and he stamped and he stamped. Until the Kryptonite was no more. This was great for his proprioception, as well as learning a bit about the science behind the ice breaking up. I am hoping that as we play this game more and more it will develop. Maybe using the characters more to tell a story.

kryptonite sensory play
Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

Disability access uk theme parks 2013 @pinkoddy #thesensoryseeker

Disability Access Guide to UK Theme Parks

Disability access uk theme parks 2013 @pinkoddy #thesensoryseeker

With half term just around the corner you may be thinking about what to do with the children. A theme park is a good idea for Sensory Seekers that like all that movement, smells, textures, visual images etc; but sometimes it is all too much, or too much for other people (strangers do not tend to warm to a child they do not know trying to touch them, never mind punching). It is for this reason that it is well worth checking the websites to  consider what the disability access policies are. This may include proof of disability (and what documentation),  any discounts for entrance (and/or any carers), car parking facilities, and special access to the rides. There are many reasons that disability access may be required, but there have been many people taking advantage of this, and things are changing. Make sure you are clear before you leave.

We have visited a few places over 2013 and this was our experience of the Disability Access:

Disability Access Merlin

I think that the Merlin Group are top notch when it comes to providing good disability access. When a Merlin annual pass is purchased, and proof of disability is shown, then a complimentary carer’s pass will be issued on the first visit. It is transferable between carers, but cannot be used without the disabled person. Proof is considered as Disability Living Allowance (DLA),Orange/Blue badge or a letter from the GP (with photographic proof).

Disability Access Legoland Windsor

Legoland Windsor was the first place we had heard of that had good disability access. We went with ASDfriendly, an Autism support online forum, and it is here we first discovered that a day out with a disability could still be fun.

Legoland Windsor Disability Access to rides

  • FREE Carer entrance ticket.
  • Loop System for hearing impaired.
  • Some staff who can speak sign language  (look for the word ‘sign’ on their badge).
  • Assistance dogs welcome; but they cannot ride and must remain with someone at all times.
  • Designated disabled car parking for disability badge holders (parking charges still apply).
  • Disabled toilet facilities.
  • Wheelchair hire.
  • Wheelchair accessible restaurants & shops.
  • Plenty of resting areas throughout the park.
  • Awareness band (to alert staff that extra assistance may be required).

The ride access pass requires some proof that the disabled person cannot queue. Disability living allowance and/or blue/orange badges are not accepted because they do not show what the condition is. The disability must mean that they “do not understand the concept of queuing, have difficulties with everyday social interaction, have a limited capacity to follow instruction or to understand others emotional feelings or expressions, and may become agitated or distressed having to wait for periods of time.”

Photo evidence is required, we took a passport.  At least one helper is essential, and has to be over the age of 14, or over 16 if the disabled person does not meet the height restriction. Up to 3 carers are allowed with the disabled person and can be rotated. Wheelchair users do not require a ride access pass.

Further info in the guide

Disability Access THORPEPARK

THORPEPARK‘s disability access makes it fair on all ride users by issuing  disabled ride user a card. When the card is presented at the exit a time is given that you can come back, as if you were queuing, but without having to physically stand in a queue. We saw this on the big rides at Disneyland Paris too.

Note we did not use their Disability help as we were given FastPasses so for further information on Disability access at THORPEPARK please see this post by My Life My Son My Way.

Disability Access Paultons Park

To avoid discrimination the entry price was the same for disabled as non-disabled visitors. To be fair I think a lot of Paultons Park  is the magic of Peppa Pig World, and a lot of that can be soaked up without even setting foot on a ride.

They have a Queue Assist Scheme, with which they DID accept a Disability Living Allowance letter and gave our disabled son a wrist band and card – which allowed up to 3 carers (note some rides had different rules on carer ratios and the disabled person always had to go on the ride). The card allowed him to go on each ride once, and was hole-punched as he did. This means that if he wanted to go on the same ride twice he had to then queue. We were fortunate that our son was okay with this but know how those with Autism could get quite obsessive about a ride and then have a meltdown for not being able to go back on as they are unable to queue. I do understand that lines need to be drawn though as many young children find it hard to queue without seeing someone go on the same ride more than once without the need for queuing.

Disability Access FlamingoLand

At Flamingoland there is a discounted admission price of £20 each, for a disabled person and their carer (total £40 instead of £60).

With proof of disability (DLA accepted, but photographic proof needed) a wrist band can be obtained, to allow riders to avoid the queue, and go through the exit (with a maximum of 2 carers). When we went we were told that if the disability was physically obvious, then they would not require further “proof”.

This is not a sponsored post. I was, however, given complimentary tickets in return for reviews on Pinkoddy’s blog. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Sensory play ice age dinosaurs for help with development #thesensoryseeker

Dinosaur Ice Age Play for Sensory Seekers

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

I discovered a great way to make sensory play  perfect for my little seeker, with dinosaur ice age play. My son has Global Developmental Delay. He is behind his peers in many areas, so I liked how the dinosaur ice age play really helped him develop. The school have suggested that he has visual aids to help with his communication. They have asked me for input on words/pictures. I really have no clue of what to suggest, all I can think of is maybe a PE bag, a book, paint, so possibly he could show me what he has done that day at school? I do know that play is key to learning, but he has always had a very limited attention span. But I am pleased to say that this is growing in duration, and this was really demonstrated during the dinosaur ice age play.

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

Dinosaurs are a firm favourite in this house (see my birthday party) and I have a dinosaur board on pinterest. Whilst pinning I have seen this activity come up time and time again. I do not know who had the original idea to give them credit, but please do see my board for where I was inspired from. It really is simple to create. Put the dinosaurs in the freezer with some water, take them out and then let your child play with them. They can smash them open and see how long it takes to get to the dinosaurs out, or wait until the water defrosts. Viola Sensory play dinosaur ice age. We bought a tuff spot (thank you to TheBoyandMe for helping me find one on Amazon) these are brilliant and it was ideal to just sit him in the garden to play.

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

You could try different methods of getting to the dinosaurs. His brother also joined in the play with him and they used sticks, bashed  and smashed the blocks of ice containing the dinosaurs. I think there may have been some licking involved too (what else would you expect from my sensory seeker!). He also tried pulling the dinosaurs out  of the frozen blocks, which I think was great for his hand manipulation (he is hyper-mobile in his hands).

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseekerdinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

Benefits of Dinosaur Ice Age Sensory Play

Dinosaur Ice Age Sensory Play was great for language development as we talked as we played: He told me it was cold – how clever is that! Then once we had got to the dinosaurs there was time for pretending they were real, and making up little stories. Of course it also helped him meet some of his sensory seeking needs – especially the tactile ones.

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

He loved the feel of rubbing his feet on the cold blocks, and when they started to melt, spreading the icy water up his legs.

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseekerdinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

He loved playing with the dinosaurs in the ice and then paddling in the defrosted water – feeling all those lovely sensations.

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

But what I most loved about the dinosaur play was the length of time he was able to engage with the activity. I am sure it really helped him with his development. I think next time I may add some colour to the water too.

      dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

 Or may be some extra things like rice to give it more texture.

dinosaur ice age sensory seeking play #thesensoryseeker

”Sunday

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays Cornwall

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